CHUNDEROSA
The relative dangers of drugs: What the science says

thomaskleppesto:

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Photo by h.koppdelaney

Humans indulge in activities that alter both the content and the experience of their own consciousness. Drugs are a means for achieving a number of particular, often recreational, changes in conscious experience. However, drugs are also a large contributor to, and facilitator of, human suffering and health problems. The best health advice anyone can give to most people most of the time regarding recreational drug use is this: “Do not use drugs”. Many people however, including me, do not find this advice particularly attractive, or even sensible. Assuming that a person wants to enjoy the mind-altering effects of psychoactive substances, two questions follows: which drugs are dangerous to use? And, more importantly - how can one know which drugs are more dangerous than others? The answer to both questions, of course, can be found through the illuminating lens of the scientific method.  

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It is important not to confuse illegality with dangerousness. The reasons why drugs are assigned particular legal statuses are mainly cultural and political in nature, not scientific. Now, does it not make sense, given the scientific understanding of relative drug harm, to correspond a drug’s legal and social status with the harm one can prescribe to it? It is of a great moral concern if risks of harm on particular psychoactive substances and their legal status remain unrelated.”

let-s-build-a-home:

odditiesoflife:

World’s Largest Stone Buddha

An ominous colored statue, this gigantic Buddha is the largest in the world. Called the Leshan Giant Buddha, the construction of this enormous carved deity began during the Tang Dynasty between 618AD and 907AD. What’s truly fascinating about this statue, aside from its size, is that it was sculpted directly out of the face of a cliff.

At the deity’s feet is the confluence of three rivers, the Minjiang, Dadu and Qingyi, located in the southern part of the Sichuan province near the city of Leshan in China. This incredible Buddha is also the tallest pre-modern statue in the world. The statue’s home is the Mount Emei Scenic Area which has been listed as UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1996.

There are two ways to get a close-up view of this impressive sight. One is to take the perilous path down the cliff face, walk in front of the Buddha and climb up the other side, as the people in the picture are doing. A more relaxing method is to take a tour boat and sail down the river. He’ll be waiting for you.

source 1, 2, 3

*blink*

lizajane:

I respect a poster that doesn’t beat around the bush.

Thank you!:)

lizajane:

I respect a poster that doesn’t beat around the bush.

Thank you!:)

If we are to make reality endurable, we must all nourish a fantasy or two.
Marcel Proust from In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower: In Search of Lost Time, Vol. 2 (Penguin Classics, 2005)
:D!

:D!

woof!

woof!

Sharing a peek at a comic ( work in progress )

Sharing a peek at a comic ( work in progress )

Somewhere unwritten poems wait, like lonely lakes not seen by anyone.
Anna Kamieńska, in an excerpt from her notebook (1968)